National Ganga River Basin Project

Posted on 8th March 2015 by admin in Rivers of the world

The World Bank is supporting the Government of India in its effort to rejuvenate the Ganga River. The $1 billion National Ganga River Basin Project is helping the National Ganga River Basin Authority (NGRBA) build institutional capacity for rejuvenating the river. It is also financing key infrastructure investments in the five mainstem states – Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Jharkhand and West Bengal.

The project has two key components: Component 1 ($200 million) supports institutional development that includes the operationalization of institutions at the central and state level; a communications and stakeholder engagement program; water quality monitoring; and technical assistance for city service providers and environmental regulators. Component 2 comprises a $800 million financing window for infrastructure investments in four sectors: waste water collection and treatment, control of industrial pollution, solid waste management, and riverfront development.

READ MORE HERE

 

US Most Endangered Rivers

Posted on 6th March 2015 by admin in Rivers of the world

The Following is an excerpt from AmericanRivers.org

 

Sounding The Alarm For Our Clean Water

The America’s Most Endangered Rivers® report is one of the best-known and longest-lived annual reports in the environmental movement. Each year since 1984, grassroots river conservationists have teamed up with American Rivers to use the report to save their local rivers, consistently scoring policy successes that benefit these rivers and the communities through which they flow.

American Rivers reviews nominations for the America’s Most Endangered Rivers report from river groups and concerned citizens across the country. Rivers are selected based upon the following criteria:

  • A major decision (that the public can help influence) in the coming year on the proposed action;
  • The significance of the river to human and natural communities;
  • The magnitude of the threat to the river and associated communities, especially in light of a changing climate

– See more at: http://www.americanrivers.org/endangered-rivers/about/#sthash.kIQ0atoF.dpuf

 

Great Mississippi River Cleanup

Posted on 28th February 2015 by admin in Rivers of the world

In 2010, the Great Mississippi River Cleanup (GMRC) was initiated by Living Lands & Waters (LL&W) to inspire communities to host an annual cleanup event. After four very successful years cleaning up primarily the Upper Mississippi River, we have now expanded our cleanup efforts to the full length of the river! From the Headwaters in Minnesota, to the Gulf of Mexico in Louisiana, volunteers participate by cleaning up the Mighty Mississippi and taking action that produces results, not rhetoric!

Read More Here…

Stream Team – L.A.

Posted on 26th February 2015 by admin in Rivers of the world

Since 1998, almost 6,000 volunteers have gone through intense training and given their time as members of Heal the Bay’s Stream Team. This volunteer crew of dedicated outdoors people spend their free time collecting environmental data in the Malibu Creek Watershed, which is the last natural watershed in Los Angeles, and home to some of the most beautiful wilderness in the L.A. area. Unfortunately, Malibu Creek, which drains to world-famous Surfrider Beach, suffers from high levels of bacteria, excessively high levels of nutrients and threatened habitat.

 


Read More Here

River Care Clean Up Events – UK

Posted on 7th February 2015 by admin in Rivers of the world

River care is an community event which gives the river a complete clean by having teams of local groups and members of the public clean up in and around the river.

Previous River care Events:

27th September 2014

This Rivercare event coincided with World Rivers Day. The event was supported by McDonald’s who kindly did river-themed face painting and supplied all volunteers with vouchers for free food. The event was also supported by the Environment Agency and the Sub Aqua Divers who managed to retrieve a lot of bulky items from the river which included 3 shopping trolleys, 1 bicycle, 2 safety rings, 4 cones, scaffold pole, 5 pieces of insulated foam board, wire basket, telephone, 2 hi fi’s, road signs, bike frame and a cash box. Volunteers on land collected 33 bags of litter. The event was featured on Saturday’s Anglia News programme.

READ MORE HERE:

The Detroit River Canadian Cleanup

Posted on 6th February 2015 by admin in Rivers of the world

The Detroit River Canadian Cleanup (DRCC) is a community-based partnership initiated in 1998 to cleanup, enhance, restore and sustain the Detroit River ecosystem. Partnerships within the DRCC aim to promote and implement the Remedial Action Plan to restore the Detroit River’s beneficial uses with the ultimate goal of removing the Detroit River from the list of Great Lakes Areas of Concern.
The federal, provincial and municipal government, local industries, scientific researchers, local environmental organizations and many dedicated citizens are key partners and play an important role in the cleanup process.

The DRCC’s member organizations provide leadership in identifying partnerships and funding opportunities to support and implement cleanup goals.

See several videos at website here:

canada

Sea trout in Seine shows success of river clean-up

Posted on 5th February 2015 by admin in Rivers of the world

For the first time since records began a healthy-looking sea trout has been discovered in the Seine, prompting Paris authorities to claim a resounding success in their bid to clean up the river after years of pollution and neglect.

The discovery of the migratory fish was “crucial evidence” that water quality was higher than ever, insisted the SIAAP, the public body in charge of cleaning up the river. “This is the first time this species has been identified in the Parisian region,” a spokesman said yesterday.

READ MORE HERE…

 


Great Mississippi River Cleanup

Posted on 15th January 2015 by admin in Rivers of the world

In 2010, the Great Mississippi River Cleanup (GMRC) was initiated by Living Lands & Waters (LL&W) to inspire communities to host an annual cleanup event. After four very successful years cleaning up primarily the Upper Mississippi River, we have now expanded our cleanup efforts to the full length of the river! From the Headwaters in Minnesota, to the Gulf of Mexico in Louisiana, volunteers participate by cleaning up the Mighty Mississippi and taking action that produces results, not rhetoric!

Link to website


barge-party

San Joaquin River

Posted on 7th January 2015 by admin in Rivers of the world

The Great Sierra River Cleanup is an annual volunteer event focused on removing trash and restoring the health of watersheds throughout the Sierra Nevada Region. This statewide effort—coordinated by the Sierra Nevada Conservancy, in conjunction with the California Coastal Cleanup Day—serves to promote good stewardship on all of our waterways, from the source at 14,000 ft., to the sea, the Pacific Ocean.

RiverTree Volunteers is hosting a cleanup site on the San Joaquin River as part of the annual Great Sierra River Cleanup. Cleanup will take place via canoes and kayaks.

 


Cleaning up the Sierra

Posted on 5th January 2015 by admin in Rivers of the world

 

Six Years of Cleaning up the Sierra

During the first six years of the Great Sierra River Cleanup, more than  24,000 volunteers have joined together to remove nearly 700 tons of trash and recyclables from watersheds throughout the Sierra Nevada. Hundreds of community groups have spread across 22 counties and over 2,200 river miles to pull appliances, cigarette butts, beverage cans, baby diapers, tires, furniture, and more from the rivers and streams that supply the State of California with more than 60 percent of its water. This effort, in partnership with the California Coastal Cleanup Day, serves to promote good stewardship on all of our waterways, from the source to the sea.


 

Read more Here

American Rivers Cleanup Map

Posted on 20th December 2014 by admin in Rivers of the world

Here’s an incredible site that has a map showing river cleanups in the US.

Find A River Cleanup Near You!

Click on the icons below to learn about cleanups happening near you.  If the cleanup is open to the public you will see contact information so you can volunteer. You can navigate the map by using the up and down arrows as well as the “+” and “-” to zoom in and out.

You may need to zoom-in to see all the cleanups in a given region. If you zoom back out, please refresh your page to reset the pins.

  • Cleanups with a green pin are currently open.
  • Cleanups with a blue pin are either private or have already occured.

– See more at: http://www.americanrivers.org/take-action/cleanup/map/

 

 

St Johns Riverkeeper – Jacksonville, FL

Posted on 17th December 2014 by admin in Rivers of the world

The St. Johns Riverkeeper mission is to work on behalf of the community for clean and healthy waters in the St. Johns River, its tributaries and its wetlands, through citizen-based advocacy.

We are a privately-funded, independent and trusted voice for the St. Johns River and the public to whom it belongs.

St. Johns Riverkeeper accomplishes its mission by:

  • Patrolling the river on a regular basis in our St. Johns Riverkeeper boat.
  • Investigating pollution problems and demanding accountability.
  • Ensuring that our environmental laws and regulations are implemented and enforced.
  • Advocating for sensible solutions and necessary policy changes to better protect the St. Johns.
  • Educating the public about the St. Johns River and the issues impacting its health.
  • Developing high quality educational resources and programs.
  • Providing frequent opportunities for students and the general public to experience the river through boat trips and field trips.
  • Informing, involving, and engaging our members and the community in the efforts to protect and restore the river’s health.
  • Participating in the public policy decision-making process to represent the interests of the river, our members, and the public.
  • Working with citizens to effectively resolve problems impacting the river in their neighborhoods and communities.
  • You can read more Here

Duwamish River Cleanup

Posted on 6th December 2014 by admin in Rivers of the world

For a century, we have straightened, poisoned, dug, soiled, filled and recontaminated the , the freshwater corridor that transformed Seattle into a major port city.

We buried old trucks and tossed in piles of oil-soaked tires. We dumped carcinogenic lubricants and coolants down drains and let solvents seep deep into its muddy bottom.

But on Tuesday — after 14 years of research and planning — the federal government unveiled a final $342 million cleanup plan that officials insist should rid the beleaguered waterway of 90 percent of its pollution.

The full effort will take nearly two decades, with costs borne by Boeing, King County, and the city of Seattle and the Port of Seattle.

Excerpt from Craig Welch, Seattle Times.

 

Dams and Rivers

Posted on 3rd December 2014 by admin in Rivers of the world

There is an excellent video on Netflix about dams in the US.

Here is an excerpt from a wonderful site about river dams:

What will 3,700 more new dams do that 48,000 existing ones haven’t already done?

Invite more problems.

According to a new study done by researchers in Europe, the 3,700 new dams under construction or planned for construction around the world will not meet the electricity demands of the developing countries where the dams are planned. Instead, these dams will pave the way for new ecological problems, reduce the number of free-flowing rivers around the world by 21%, and perhaps even cause conflict between countries over water.

See More Here:

 

Tennessee River Rescue

Posted on 18th November 2014 by admin in Rivers of the world

People being active in Tennessee!!!

25 years ago a group of environmentalists decided enough was enough. Disgusted by the trash lining the Tennessee River, they started a grassroots efforts to make a difference in the Scenic City.

Each year volunteers help protect our source of drinking water during Tennessee River Rescue. Hundreds of people fan out across 20 zones in Bradley, Hamilton and Marion counties to clean up the banks of the Tennessee River and some tributaries. Tons of tires, plastic bottles and other trash have been removed by these eco-warriors over the years.

25 years ago a group of environmentalists decided enough was enough. Disgusted by the trash lining the Tennessee River, they started a grassroots efforts to make a difference in the Scenic City.

Each year volunteers help protect our source of drinking water during Tennessee River Rescue. Hundreds of people fan out across 20 zones in Bradley, Hamilton and Marion counties to clean up the banks of the Tennessee River and some tributaries. Tons of tires, plastic bottles and other trash have been removed by these eco-warriors over the years.

(From the about us page at:  http://tennesseeriverrescue.org/about-us/

Tennessee River Rescue

 

Restoring Europe’s Rivers

Posted on 6th November 2014 by admin in Rivers of the world

From the industrial cities of Britain to the forests of Sweden, from the plains of Spain to the shores of the Black Sea, Europe is restoring its rivers to their natural glory. The most densely populated continent on earth is finding space for nature to return along its river banks.

The restoration is not perfect. River floodplains cannot be fully restored when they contain cities, and hydroelectric dams are still needed.

Danube River in Germany

Wikimedia Commons
The Danube River as it flows through Kelheim, Germany.


Europe’s fluvial highways are becoming the test bed for conservation biologist Edward O. Wilson’s dream that the 21st century should be “the era of restoration in ecology.”

article by fred pearce at e.360.yale.edu

 

Fox River Cleanup – Green Bay

Posted on 29th October 2014 by admin in Rivers of the world

The Fox River Cleanup Project is designed to reduce risk to human health and the environment due to the presence of PCBs in Fox River sediment, It’s a multi-year cleanup effort that includes dredging, capping and covering over a 13-mile stretch of the Lower

Fox River.The project officially started with dredging and processing on April 28, 2009.

 

—————————————————–

From the govt. EPA website:

PCBs do not degrade naturally, but instead concentrate in the environment and the food chain resulting in health hazards to humans, fish and wildlife. The Lower Fox River project involves the cleanup of sediment (mud) contaminated with PCBs, as well as the restoration of the natural resources damaged by these contaminants.

A number of federal, state and tribal agencies have joined efforts to address this important issue through regulatory avenues including Superfund, the Natural Resource Damage Assessment, and state spill authorities.

————————————————

 

http://foxrivercleanup.com/

Clean Rivers Project in DC

Posted on 22nd October 2014 by admin in Rivers of the world

Restoring Our Rivers

The Clean Rivers Project is DC Water’s ongoing program to reduce combined sewer overflows into the District’s waterways – the Anacostia and Potomac Rivers and Rock Creek. The Project is a massive infrastructure and support program designed to capture and clean water during heavy rainfalls before it ever reaches our rivers

Protecting Our District

With the Clean Rivers Project, DC Water will protect the public from possible harmful substances in our wastewater. It is also cleaning up our waterways, by reducing the pollutants that enter our rivers and can be harmful to our wildlife.

Link to their page…

 

 


California Bans Plastic Bags

Posted on 14th October 2014 by admin in Rivers of the world

This article was posted on Sep 30 2014 by Tracy Russo

After an insistent year-long campaign by environmental and citizen activists, Governor Jerry Brown signed into law yesterday SB 270, legislation introduced by State Senator Alex Padilla (D) from Los Angeles. The legislation prohibits the use of single-use plastic bags in grocery and retail stores throughout the state of California, the first state in the nation to do so. The bill actually goes beyond a simple “bag ban.”Recognizing that removing plastic bags is only one strategy in the battle against wasteful consumption of both renewable and nonrenewable resources, the bill also requires that a surcharge of at least 10 cents be levied on paper bags, compostable bags, and even reusable plastic bags.

Response from environmental organizations is celebratory – but not jubilant. “It’s clear that there is a growing grass-roots movement not just in California but across the country to stop plastic pollution,” observes Dianna Cohen, CEO of the Plastic Pollution Coalition (PPC). “Our coalition consists of over 380 NGOs, businesses, and prominent individuals from around the world, all dedicated in their own ways to bringing about a measurable reduction of single-use and disposable plastics — plastic shopping bags, plastic bottles, and straws being the most pervasive.”

link to article:

 

Check out American Rivers Website

Posted on 7th October 2014 by admin in Rivers of the world

Excerpt from their front page:

Working Together To Clean Our Waterways

National River Cleanup® was launched in 1991, offering support to individuals, organizations and anyone interested in conducting a cleanup on their local river. By registering a cleanup with American Rivers, organizers receive free trash bags, assistance with online and print media coverage, volunteer promotion online and technical support.

Since its start, more than 1,241,610 volunteers have participated in thousands of cleanups across the country covering more than 252,694 miles of waterways. These cleanups have removed more than 20.7 million pounds of litter and debris from America’s rivers and streams.

2013 was the most successful year in the history of National River Cleanup®, thanks to our organizers, volunteers and sponsors!

National River Cleanup 2013 Statistics:

515 registered cleanups
104,110 volunteers nationwide
4.2 million pounds of trash removed from America’s waterways

– See more at: http://www.americanrivers.org/

2014 Photo Contest Winner

The Great Sierra River Cleanup

Posted on 1st October 2014 by admin in Rivers of the world

Six Years of Cleaning up the Sierra

During the first six years of the Great Sierra River Cleanup, more than  23,000 volunteers have joined together to remove more than 600 tons of trash and recyclables from watersheds throughout the Sierra Nevada. Hundreds of community groups have spread across 22 counties and over 2,200 river miles to pull appliances, cigarette butts, beverage cans, baby diapers, tires, furniture, and more from the rivers and streams that supply the State of California with more than 60 percent of its water. This effort, in partnership with the California Coastal Cleanup Day, serves to promote good stewardship on all of our waterways, from the source to the sea.


Here’s a link to the site:  www.sierranevada.ca.gov/our-work/rivercleanup

 

GR Collection shown in Mexico City

Posted on 19th March 2013 by admin in Rivers of the world

Wow we have an amazing opportunity coming up!! The Global Rivers Collection is going to be shown in the Metro Station in Mexico City for The International Art Day Celebration on May 15th.The Collection will also be shown on from May 6th through the 10th at Medero University in Pueblo Mexcio.:0)

The Global Rivers project Goes to Cleveland Ohio and to the MoMA this month

Posted on 29th March 2011 by admin in Rivers of the world

Dear River Community,
Such wonderful things have happened for the Global Rivers Project this month but I must admit I’ve put off blogging as I feel almost paralyzed with grief about Japan. I am beset by visions of radiation poisoning and devistation in our water and on our land. I’ve become prayerful and inward. Now it is time to reach out with all my might and start working again on our next project, which, was put in motion months before the tsunami hit, but, as serendipity, might have it, we have in the pipe line, an art exchange with Japan. We will be creating healing Origami for the people of Japan…

Thanks to Dr Peter Whitehouse we have been teamed up with the Saint Luke’s Hospital in Japan. We are calling the project, Healing Origami/Folding the River of Life. The idea is to get as many people as possible to fold and origami figures to ride above a folded river. We hope to have 1000 origami figurers just as in Japan it has been a time honored tradition to create 1000 cranes for someone who is ill. We will create 1000 animal birds and plants that grace the shore of our little, Cleveland , inner city river, the Doan Brook.

Next blog I will recap what I leaned as we completed the first stage of our  art exchange in Cleveland with the TIS School and nursing home, Judson Mannor. In the blog after that I’ll tell you about MoMA and the symposium on art and Alzheimers’s called Mapping Perceptions.

Thanks for visiting and please write back. Bernice

A Little Taste of a Wonderful Experience

Posted on 7th March 2011 by admin in Rivers of the world

Dear Friends,
It is with a heart full to brimming, that I write to you today. I’ve just started the process of reviewing the Doan Brook Cleveland residency experience of last week and, I just can’t tell you how much I learned. The first thing that struck me is the amazing interconnectedness in concept and mission between the Intergenerational School and the Judson Smart Living community. The mission Statements of both create a perfect match, in that they are both based on compassion and connection with the earth. I might add, I witnessed some of the smartest and most effective, and compassionate methods in both childhood education and elder care that I have ever experienced.
I felt like I came into this perfect marriage with a puzzle, piece that was much appreciated, which were stories of the water and a few about the earth. The response to these stories was an incredible intergenerational celebration of what is.. How it is with the water. For this lesson I was embraced, agreed with and appreciated for one whole week by people of all ages who treat each other with respect.. Oh also, I got to meet 13 true hero/elders, the folks who fought to save the river in the late 60’s. During this residency they got to meet children from 4 generations later who appreciated their efforts. Sound like Heaven? It was.

Tori asks , where do we go from here? Let’s take a minute to vision about that… While we think I leave you with the words of some of these elder/heroes who worked in the late 60’s to save the Dan Brook.
When asked what words they would like to pass on to the youth about the waters here is what they said..
“Pru Garrettson
“Our bodies are largely made up of water, so, protect the Earth’s water supply for your health.”

Kathy Barber
“Don’t ever hang back! Jump in with both feet to save the water and protect the water of the Earth for your health.”

Florence Spurney
“Save the Earth let’s start at Home!”

Leanne Rayburn
The reaction to the highway was a huge spontaneous revolution. Everyone was in agreement, and against it. It was a ground swell.”
Let’s start our new chapter by passing these words along to the kids. They say volumes..
Much love to all new Friends,
Bernice

TN Stream Mitigation Program: Poor Performance

Posted on 13th February 2011 by Dharmaja in Rivers of the world

Way to go WSMV-TV, Nashville (Channel 4 News)!!!

Reporting on the cheap sale of Tennessee streams to developers, the Tennessee Stream Mitigation Program (TSMP) accepts $200 per linear foot of stream destroyed.  The buyer (developer) is required by law to ‘mitigate’ or replace each foot of stream that is destroyed.  However, according to Joey Woodard, Director of TSMP, they have only 70% compliance, which is, according to him “pretty good.”

Say What?!!  In what world is a 70% success rate “pretty good?”  This is at best a C- and at worst a D or an F!! 

Mr. Woodard also states in his interview that 80% of their projects to mitigate streams occur within a 30 mile radius of the original stream site.  With a sardonic grin he asserts that this is a “pretty good scale.”  While I agree that a B might be called “pretty good,” I flat out demand more than a PRETTY GOOD rating from an organization charged with protecting such a precious resource as our natural waterways. 

It is time to demand a higher success rate from the Tennessee Stream Mitigation Program approaching somewhere in the range of 100%. Period. It is time to uphold our GOOD LAWS.

Mr. Joey Woodard can be reached at:  (615) 831-9311, ext.111.

-Dharmaja, Editor

Tennessee Town Takes Notice

Posted on 12th February 2011 by Dharmaja in Rivers of the world

Dear Readers,

A small Tennessee town has taken notice of our message to protect the water supply.  Our mission to provide education and options to small towns which are likely to be presented with cheap water buy-outs appears to be working! We are focused on getting the word out to areas that have not yet been approached by a conglomerate so that when they are, they are armed with information, initiative, and community support. 

It looks as if Water Fandango will soon be a reality! Water Fandango, a fundraising concert in support of small towns getting the resources they need without having to rely on the cheap buyouts offered by multi-billion dollar corporations seeking new supply for the bottling industry.

Go go go!

OK we are on a roll.. Global Rivers goes back to Cleveland the city where it started in 1996

Posted on 20th January 2011 by admin in Rivers of the world

For the past year, GRAE has been working on a project that connects progressive institutions to one another in the Cleveland-area:  The Intergenerational School (TIS); a retirement community called Judson Park; The Shaker Lakes Nature CenterThe Doan Brook Partnership; and Parade The Circle, put on every summer by The Cleveland Museum of Art.  The goal: facilitate collaboration between institutions to bond people of all ages to their local watershed.

The next phase of the project will begin on February 28th, 2011, and here’s the agenda:

Bonding the Youth and Elders of The School for Intergenerational Study to the Doan Brook Watershed.

Project Description

A five day artist-in-residency program created for elementary age students and their elder mentors, wherein the participants will learn the rich history of the Doan Brook.

The course of study will proceed in chronological order of events:

  • the Wisconsin Glaciation and the tribes that migrated from Asia during prehistoric times. 
  • The Erie Indians and other native groups that lived in this region. 
  • The Shaker people and the wool mill they operated on the Doan Brook.
  • The late 19th century, when the Rockefeller family purchased the land bordering the Doan for city workers to have a lovely place to stroll and appreciate nature.
  • The 1960’s, when the Army Core of Engineers proposed to cover the Doan Brook with a highway system. Residents protested against this idea with demonstrations and were successful in preserving this natural treasure for the people of Cleveland.

The students will interpret these stories in drawings and a core group of participants will work on making giant puppets and hats to wear in a “river appreciation parade” which will take place in their neighborhood. In June there will be another opportunity to “wear their river” costumes in the famous Parade the Circle event hosted by the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Working with the Elders
As mentioned previously there is a fascinating component to the Doan Brook history which occurred in the 1960’s. Neighborhood activists blocked the proposal to cover the Doan brook with a highway system. Several of these Freeway Fighters are living in Judson Manner and Judson Park retirement centers. Judson partners closely with TIS. They both share the philosophy of the importance of integrating the different generations and bonding both the students and the elders with the natural world.

The Global Rivers Art Exchange shares this exact goal. We will blend our projects by taking up residency in the guest apartment at one of the Judson facilities; there we will meet the elders who heroically stood up for the Doan. As they tell their stories I will create large watercolor portraits that the students will carry in the parade. We will also be collecting Wishes for the River Doan that the elders offer to us. The children will fold these wishes into Origami figures that they will wear in the parade.

A Sister School Collaboration                                                                                                                                                                                                          The students of the Martin Methodist College Art team have joined TIS in a creative partnership to help teach the participants in Cleveland about their river. They have created headdresses to be worn in the parade and are working on a giant puppet called Pappy Water who will hold the history of the Doan on his garment. Since the Doan is famous for the Shaker community and their wool mill, Pappy Water is made entirely of wool felt. The students will be shown the simple process of felting and will be able to contribute felt pieces to the puppet.

The TIS School already has a wonderful environmental project called the Forest Garden. Our goal is to put some of the students to work painting their rain barrel water catchments with the pictorial history of the Doan. Working in consort with TIS art instructor Arenda Evens we plan to give each core group a task that will lead to completing these goals.

As the Director of the Global Rivers Art Exchange Project, I, Bernice Davidson, will facilitate this art project,  and will also bring art from 3 continents, about the rivers of the world, to display at the school during the residency..From  April to June 2011 The Global Rivers Art  will be on display at the Shaker Nature Center in Cleveland, Ohio.

Documentaries to Watch

Posted on 3rd January 2011 by Dharmaja in Rivers of the world

Blue Gold: World Water Wars

Tapped

Flow

And a book for good measure: Bottlemania

Eco-Friendly Rockers

Posted on 30th December 2010 by Dharmaja in Rivers of the world

I’m thinking some of these guys will want to be involved in Water Aid 2011.  Check out Rolling Stone article on The 15 Most Eco-Friendly Rockers!

Food and Water Watch

Posted on 30th December 2010 by Dharmaja in Rivers of the world

Here is a link to the Food and Water Watch website. Please click here to view their stance on privatization of water.

Getting Press!

Posted on 27th December 2010 by Dharmaja in Rivers of the world

Global Rivers Art movement is gaining momentum in Pulaski Co., Tennessee!  Bernice wrote a stirring letter to the editor of The Pulaski Citizen and the paper is running with it.  Just follow the link to read the article on the issue; and on the front page no less. 

The Tennessee Clean Water Network is also lending a helping hand in getting the word out to other towns and counties who are, or will soon face the same dilemma.  Tennessee is facing a real epidemic of water thievery, all over the state.  Please join us in bringing awareness to this issue by talking about it with friends, family, co-workers, whomever will listen:  Water belongs to the people, not corporations. 

In my own family, I’ve put my foot down about buying the tiny bottles of water, en masse from Costco.  Even buying the distilled water, rather than spring water, propagates the creation of more plastic bottles, which is a detrimental enterprise.

Listen, if it can happen in Tennessee, then it can happen to any of the rural farmlands in the country.  Raise awareness in your own community so that when the big bottling company comes to yourtown, the people will not be caught off-guard by big promises and small delivery.

I Stick My Neck Out a Little Bit More

Posted on 22nd December 2010 by admin in Rivers of the world

After going to two meetings (one city council and one utilities meeting) about the selling of the water in Minor Hill TN, I didn’t feel much satisfaction.  So I wrote the following letter to the editor of the county news paper.. This is the first time in my life I’ve written a letter to the editor. It feels good. I feel like I’m going the distance to warn the people not to sell their water rights to a bottling company. Here’s the letter:

Hello, Friends —

As a resident of Lawrence County who has been working in Pulaski for 10 years, I have been studying the water situation in Giles county, and beyond, for a number of years. There is a disturbing new trend going on around the world — the waters of water-rich areas are being bought, bottled, transported and sold by corporate firms, draining local area aquifers for sale elsewhere. This privatization of natural resources can create disaster with the drinking water of local communities.

Only very recently, Campbellsville Spring was in danger of being sold to a company, but a few brave folks kept that from happening for the time being. Right now, the town of Minor Hill is close to making a deal to sell their underground waters to a bottling company contracting with local officials to drill a well, in order to address the local water supply problem. If water is found, the agreement will be a trade-off of residents’ water rights, in return for the same water to be sold back to Minor Hill’s citizens. The following are a few talking points concerning what has happened in other places, where the waters have been privatized:

Points for citizens of Minor Hill, TN, concerning the sale of water to Amnisos — a bottling company:

  1. The water in the Giles County watershed is a natural resource in-place since the beginning of time. When large quantities of water are removed from an aquifer, it is not replenished by seasonal rains.
  2. Most of the streams and creeks in Giles County are either polluted, or are on the Seriously Compromised list. If the “sweet water” from underground is removed, it leaves the toxins in the water above ground more concentrated.
  3. Have local residents — the voting public — been made aware of both the pros and cons of this proposal?
  4. Small towns with good water all over the world have been dealing with the issue of water privatization. Here are some of the problems that residents have to deal with, after their waters have been privatized:
  • The Pacific island nation of Fiji sold its water to a bottling company of the same name. Now, after years of having their water transported far away, 51% of Fiji’s population does not have access to clean drinking water. Waterborne illnesses are now rampant on the island.

 

  •  Atlanta, GA sold the water rights to Lake Lanier to the Coca-Cola Company. During the last three- year drought, when Atlanta residents were on very strict water rations, Coca-Cola Co. refused to stop taking water in abundance. Everyone reading this knows someone who has had to truck their water during a recent drought. Dry wells were a fact all over Giles County. Once we start removing large volumes of water from underground, expect dry wells to become more of a problem.

 

  • Towns that were promised local jobs from water companies in the past, have found that the bottling plants are highly automated, and do not provide the many job opportunities that were promised.

 

  • Please protect future generations from want, and keep local waters in the hands of the local people. The water is part of our commonwealth, not to be sold to private companies for their enrichment.

 

  • Many small towns have traded water rights for well-digging, and have then found that the bottling companies wind up selling the water for a high price, while paying relatively little for it.

 

  • Even with a contract clause stating that the city of Minor Hill is to have first rights to buy the well, should the company decide to sell, Minor Hill may not have time to raise enough funds, and the water rights will be out of local control forever.

 

  • This is not just an issue for residents of Minor Hill alone, it is a problem that could eventually affect us all. We must find alternative solutions.

 
*** An Idea ***

There is so much musical talent in this area that I often wonder if it’s due to something in the water. Why not have a few fundraising concerts/festivals, invite some noted musicians and songwriters to perform, and call it WATER AID? This could be a source of funds to purchase the much-needed well for the city of Minor Hill, keeping the local waters in the hands of the community.
Sincerely,

Bernice Davidson

Keepers of The Waters

Posted on 18th December 2010 by Dharmaja in Rivers of the world

Bernice discovered a resource in Keepers of The Waters; an organization dedicated to the preservation of water through community-based, art driven projects.  Betsy Damon founded Keepers in 1991, with the assistance of the Hubert Humphrey Institute in Minnesota and has since done numerous art installations and performances around the globe.  She was also awarded the Top Honor Award from the Waterfront Center in Washington, D.C in 1998.

The website can be viewed at Keepers of The Water.

Short Introduction

Posted on 17th December 2010 by Dharmaja in Rivers of the world

Dear Readers of Global Rivers Blog,

I wanted to just introduce myself in a short message. My name is Dharmaja and I will be doing some research and writing for the blog. I am very happy to be able to help and honored to have been asked.

Please look out for an upcoming post on Keepers of the Waters, sharing the amazing work of Betsy Damon to heal the waters of the world!!!

If you haven’t already, please sign up for the RSS feed and receive a notification whenever a new post goes up!

Many Thanks, Dharmaja Maldonado

The Talking Points; Why Minor Hill Should Not Sell Their Water to a Private Company

Posted on 10th December 2010 by admin in Rivers of the world

Talking Points for the City of Minor Hill, TN
Concerning the sale of water to Amnisos, a water bottling company.

1. The water in the Giles County watershed is a resource that has been in place since time immemorial. Large quantities of water removed from the aquifer are not replenished by seasonal rains!

2. Many of the streams and creeks in Giles County are either polluted or are on the seriously compromised list. If the underground “sweet water” is removed, more concentrated toxins remain in the water above ground.

3. Has the public been made aware of both the pros and cons of this proposal?

4. All over the world, small towns with good water have been dealing with this new issue of water privatization. Here are some of the problems that the citizens have to deal with once the water has been bought up.

a)  The island of Fiji sold its water to a bottling company with the same name. Now, after years of having their water transported elsewhere, 51% of Fiji’s population does not have access to clean drinking water. Waterborne illnesses are now rampant on this island.

b)  The city of Atlanta sold the water rights of Lake Lanier to the Coca-Cola Company. During the latest three year drought, when every citizen was on very strict water rations, the Coca-Cola Company refused to stop taking water in abundance. I’m sure everyone in this room knows someone who has had to truck their water during the recent drought. We have dealt with dry wells all over the county. The underground water is all connected. Once we start removing large quantities of drinking water, expect dry wells to become more of a problem.

c)  Towns that have been promised jobs from water companies in the past have found that the bottling plants are highly automated and do not provide the many job opportunities they were promised.

5. Please protect future generations and keep the water in the hands of the people. The water is part of our “common wealth” and is not to be sold to private, outside companies.

Out of my Comfort Zone and Out on a Limb… What did I promise?

Posted on 8th December 2010 by admin in Rivers of the world

Did you ever feel this? You get called to a meeting by a small group of elders. People whom, if you could pick a person in your life that exhibits profound generousity, good sense, talent and other virtures, these three people would be it. So they call you to a small meeting and they tell you about the bottling company that lies in wait to buy, for nearly nothing, the water rights of a lively and free water spring feed about 30 miles from your home. I gulped and said yes, knowing that there would probably come a time when I’d have to speak amongst strangers about their water system. This deal was aborted, but the same agent shows up in a neighboring town, which is now in the final stages of signing the water rights away… You are asked to take action…

These three elders supported me by helping to get in touch with people who could help me get up to speak about about the water issues in my area. Renee Hoyes from The TN Clean Water Network was invaluable in helping me craft The Talking Points which we presented at the Minor Hill City Council last night. (The talking points will be in a following blog.)

It had been weeks of studying the fact that Minor Hill needs jobs and that the people of Minor Hill have been promised a re-opening of their factory and a six person work force. The Mayor himself told me a well and water treatment plant would cost two million dollars. He asked me how I would solve the problem? It took me a good week to come up with the solution: Art saving the day.

Why don’t we find a celebrity who would come out for the water and we could put on a Water Aid type event taking a cue off of a hero to the farmers, Wilie Nelson. Who, incidentally, will be the first person I ask to sing for the water.

If you are a talented singer song writer or know of one that would come out and do a benefit to keep the water rights in the hands of the people, send in your message to us here.

I want to thank my students who came out with courage and pluck to have my back while I spoke for the water. Thanks Guys I love ya.

The Real Truth About Bottled Water

Posted on 11th November 2010 by admin in Rivers of the world

Have you seen the movie “Tapped”, or read the book, Bottlemania? More and more disturbing information has been coming out about a megatrend occuring all over the world. Because of our penchant for carrying a plastic bottle of water around, Coke, Nestle, Pepsi and some other big companies are buying-up public water and shipping it out of the local communities.
In Atlanta, even during times of extreme drought, Coke continued to suck water out of Lake Lanier, while the community was heavily rationed. Let’s stop buying bottled water! I have a Brita water filter for my tap water, and use a stainless steel water bottle that works great. Join me in saying “No!” to bottled water. Let’s keep water in the hands of the community.

The Students Join in on a Dance for the River

Posted on 26th October 2010 by admin in Rivers of the world

Thank Heavens for young people who are uninhibited enough to dress up in funny costumes dance for the river. Here are some pictures of that momentous occasion. A big thank you to the Wood and Strings Puppet theater for the River Guardian Puppets.

Water Appreciation Parade Tomorrow So Excited Can’t Sleep

Posted on 20th October 2010 by admin in Rivers of the world

Tomorrow Oct 29th at 5:00 on green  at Martin Methodist College in Pulaski TN The Global Rivers Art Exchange and the Martin Art Team will launch the first of many Water  Appreciation Parades.   The Wood and Strings Puppet theater will join us too as we create the largest waltz for the water ever staged. More later… Here’s a sneak peak at two of our many  parade hats.

Newsweek cover story October 18th 2010…

Posted on 19th October 2010 by admin in Rivers of the world

Cover shows a a giant water drop hitting a puddle text reads: LIQUID ASSET Big Business and the Race to Control the World’s Water, on page 42, it is chilling.. The arcticle, written by Jeneen Interlandi, talks about Sita Alaska home of the worlds most spectacular lakes and trillions of gallons of pure water.. In a few months if all goes according to plan 80 million gallons of Blue Lake water will be siphoned into the kind of tankers usually reserved for oil and shipped to Mumbai India.  From there it goes into bottles and shipped to the Middle East. This article is well worth the read. I actually had a hard time reading this, as it scares me to think we are on the brink of watching corporations take the right of clean water away from humanity. As far as i can see the fad of bottled water could be the last straw in a precarious situation. We are dealing with a similar concern as a few bottling companies vie for an outstanding freshwater spring called Campbellsville Spring in our area (see earlier blog)… Also, I’m  opened for all kinds of sollutions to this problem. Feel free to comment … next blog is an expose on a few of your everyday water bottle companies. Prepare to get frustrated and scandalized…

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